Executive Branch Facts

Executive Branch Facts
The Executive Branch of the U.S. government includes the President of the United States, the Vice President of the United States, the Executive Office of the President, and the Cabinet. The President of the United States is the Commander-in-Chief of the United States Armed Forces, and head of state. The Vice President of the United States advises the President, and is prepared to take over in the case of the President being unable to continue in his role. The Executive Office of the President (EOP) is responsible for advising the President on national security issues, intelligence issues, and briefing the people of the U.S. on the President's actions in the press. The Cabinet is made up of 15 different government department heads, each responsible for a different department such as the Department of Defense or Department of Transportation.
Interesting Executive Branch Facts:
The President of the United States, as head of the Executive Branch, has several powers according to the United States Constitution. These include: the ability to veto or sign into law legislation that has been voted for by Congress, the ability to appoint federal positions such as federal judges, the ability to negotiate international treaties, and the ability to grant pardons for crimes.
In order to be elected the President of the United States an individual must be 35 years of age or older, must have been living in the United States for 14 years, and must be a natural born citizen of the United States.
The Vice President of the United States is capable of breaking a tie in Senate voting, and is an advisor to the President. He or she must be ready to take over in the case of the President's death or inability to continue in his or her role as President.
The Executive Office includes the White House Staff, the National Security Council, close advisors to the President, the Press Secretary, and others.
The Cabinet of the Executive Office includes 15 departments.
The Department of Agriculture is also called the USDA and oversees farming and food safety, and the protection of farmland.
The Department of Commerce oversees and promotes the economy of the U.S., issuing patents, and trademarks, assisting in trade agreements with other countries, and supporting business and innovation.
The Department of Defense (DOD) oversees the military which includes the Navy, Army, and Air Force. It is the largest department.
The Department of Education oversees education and tries to ensure that education is available to anyone.
The Department of Energy (DOE) oversees energy security in the country, and supporting energy research and innovation.
The Department of Health and Human Services works for American's health, and oversees the FDA and CDC.
The Department of Homeland Security works to prevent terrorism in the U.S.
The Department of Housing and Urban Development oversees housing needs in the U.S.
The Department of the Interior oversees national parks, wildlife, natural resources, and land.
He Department of Justice enforces laws and protects the public, through agencies such as the FBI.
The Department of Labor oversees employment in the U.S.
The Department of State handles international relationships.
The Department of Transportation oversees transportation in the U.S.
The Department of the Treasury oversees the U.S. financial system.
The department of Veteran's Affairs oversees benefit programs for the country's veterans.


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