Motion

Motion is the movement in which an object changes it position. A person may know an object moved and motion has taken place by looking at the other objects nearby. For example, while on a boat it may not feel like it is moving, but as the boat drifts along the shore, the view changes.

A frame of reference can be created after a reference point is chosen relative to the position of an object. For example, a person on a train car can seem to be moving, but it is actually the train car moving and the person is still. The person's position does not change. The frame of reference is the person on the train, which shows that the train is moving.

Velocity includes how fast an object is in motion or its speed plus its direction. Speed can be determined using different measurements over a period of time to determine how fast an object is moving. For example, the speed of a car may be measured at 50 miles per hour. The car will travel a distance of 50 miles in one hour, which is the unit of time. Speed can be measured per hour, per minute, per second, and others. The velocity of a storm tells meteorologists the direction of a hurricane which will help residents to prepare for the hurricane to remain safe. The velocity is the speed and direction of a moving object.

Acceleration is the force applied to an object changing its speed, direction, or both. Acceleration may increase or decrease the speed or velocity of an object. For example, when a person is driving a car they may use acceleration to cause it to move faster. When a person is walking and decides to start running, the person will accelerate by using leg muscles to help them run faster.

Deceleration is also a force applied to an object changing its speed, direction, or both. Deceleration is a type of acceleration that will decrease the speed or velocity of an object. An example of deceleration is a person driving a car decides to slow down by pressing on the brake. It can also include a runner slowing down to rest while running a marathon.

Friction is a force that will also affect the motion of an object. Friction is the force that opposes the sliding motion between two touching surfaces. In other words, friction can affect the speed of an object's movement, usually by decreasing the speed.

Examples may include a person moving a piece of furniture on a carpeted floor. The carpet makes it more difficult to move it and the couch does not slide quickly across the floor; its speed decreased. A sled on snow may not slide so quickly sometimes because friction between the rudders and snow may decrease its speed. Friction will affect how quickly a person can rub their hands together. The more friction there is the more difficult it will be for the person to rub their hands together.

There are many other variables affecting motion as well, including the weight of the object, the amount of force, temperature, size, and several other variables. Even gravity may affect the motion of an object. People who have landed on the moon move very easily because there is little or no gravity. While on Earth gravity affect their movement or motion.

In summary, motion is the movement in which an object changes its position. Using a frame of reference, it is possible to prove something moved. Acceleration and deceleration will affect the speed and velocity of an object in motion, and friction usually decreases the speed of an object's motion.




A: Acceleration
B: Deceleration
C: Friction
D: Velocity

A: Acceleration
B: Deceleration
C: Motion
D: Frame of reference

A: Acceleration
B: Deceleration
C: Friction
D: Gravity

A: Frame of reference
B: Motion
C: Deceleration
D: Velocity

A: Friction
B: Velocity
C: Motion
D: Speed

A: Friction
B: Frame of reference
C: Velocity
D: Gravity








Related Topics
Newton's Laws of Motion Quiz
Projectile Motion Formulas
Linear speed Formula (straight line motion)
Motion Identification Quiz
Projectile Motion
Newton's Three Laws of Motion Quiz
Vectors and Motion in Two and Three Dimensions
Simple Harmonic Motion
Circular Motion
Forms of Energy (solar, heat, sound, and motion) Quiz

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