Solubility Formula

Solubility Formula

If a substance is soluble, it can be dissolved. The solubility refers to the maximum amount of solute that can be dissolved in a given amount of solvent at a specified temperature. The amount of solvent is typically 100 grams and the temperature, 25°C.

When an ionic substance dissolves in water, it breaks apart into its ions. The number of ions created in solution is directly related to the formula of the ionic compound. The general format for an ionic substance dissolving in water is as follows:

AX(s) → A+(aq) + X-(aq)

Solubility Formula Questions:

1. How many moles of ions are created in solution when 1.0 mole of calcium chloride dissolves in water?

Answer:

In order to solve this problem, the correct formula of calcium chloride must be found and the dissolution equation written.

CaCl2(s) → Ca2+(aq) + 2Cl-(aq)

In this example, 1 mole of CaCl2 will produce 1 mole of Ca2+ ions and 2 moles of Cl- ions, therefore a total of 3 moles of ions are produced in solution.

2. How many moles of nitrate ions are produced when 1.0 mole of aluminum nitrate dissolves in water?

Answer:

Al(NO3)3(s) → Al3+(aq) + 3NO3-(aq)

Three moles of nitrate ions are produced when 1.0 mole of aluminum nitrate dissolves.

Related Links:
Solubility Rules Quiz
Solubility Quiz
Solubility and Acid-Base Equilibrium Quiz






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