Phong Nha-ke Bang National Park Facts

Phong Nha-ke Bang National Park Facts
Phong Nha-ke Bang National Park is an 857.54 square kilometer park located in Quang Binh Province, Vietnam. It shares a border with the People's Democratic Republic of Laos' Hin Namno Nature Reserve. The park was created in part to help protect the more than 104km of underground rivers and caves which evolved over the last 400 million years into the limestone karst ecosystem it is today. The park contains Asia's oldest karst mountains, and was designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 2003. The world's largest cave named Son Doong was discovered in 2009 in Phong Nha-ke Bang National Park by a research team.
Interesting Phong Nha-ke Bang National Park Facts:
There were five stages in the development of the earth's crust that led to the creation of Phong Nha-ke Bang National Park. These included the Early Silurian Stage, the Middle-late Devonian Stage, the Carboniferous-Permian Stage, the Mesozoic Orogenic Stage, and the Cenozoic Stage.
Prior to being designated a national park, Phong Nha-ke Bang National Park was a nature reserve called the Phong Nha Nature Reserve. It was only 50 square kilometers when it was established in 1986.
In 1991 Phong Nha Nature Reserve was expanded to 411.32 square kilometers.
In 2001 Phong Nha Nature Reserve was re-designated as Phong Nha-ke Bang National Park.
Phong Nha-ke Bang National Park was created to help protect the rare native species in the area, the forest resources, scientifically valuable flora and fauna, and the caves and underground river systems that make up the karst ecosystem in the park.
There are three zones in Phong Nha-ke Bang National Park including the 'administrative service zone', the 'strictly protected zone', and the ecological recovery zone'.
Humidity is usually at roughly 84% due to the high amount of rainfall in the park. 88% of the rain falls between July and December but it rains every month, for more than 160 days each year.
The main rivers in Phong Nha-ke Bang National Park include Chay and Son. The park is also home to breathtaking waterfalls, springs, and streams.
Son Doong, the largest cave in the world, contains 300 caves and grottos. It is significant because it contains evidence of the history of the earth's evolution.
The most common vegetation in Phong Nha-ke Bang National Park is that of a tropical dense moist evergreen forest, and over 96% of the park is covered in forest.
Wildlife found in Phong Nha-ke Bang National Park includes ten species and subspecies of primates, langurs, mainland serows, Asian black bears, sun bears, Sunda pangolins, striped hares, and many others.
There are 59 recorded amphibian and reptile species, 72 species of fish, more than 200 bird species, and 259 species of butterflies in Phong Nha-ke Bang National Park.
Visitors to Phong Nha-ke Bang National Park can enjoy tours of the caves, ecotourism opportunities, trekking, mountain climbing, and take tours of the museum.
Visitors to the park are not allowed to hike without the presence of licensed tour guide as there are still unexploded weapons on the ground in certain areas dating back to the Vietnam War.


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