Gates of the Arctic National Park Facts

Gates of the Arctic National Park Facts
Gates of the Arctic National Park is an 8,472,506 acre park located in Coldfoot, Alaska in the United States. It is the country's most northern national park, located completely above the Arctic Circle. It is also the second largest national park in the country. The park was originally designated Gates of the Arctic National Monument in 1978, but in 1980 following the establishment of the Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act, the monument was re-designated as a national park. 7,167,192 acres of the park are further protected as Gates of the Arctic Wilderness area, which joins the Noatak Wilderness Area.
Interesting Gates of the Arctic National Park Facts:
Gates of the Arctic National Park got its name because of its location - north of the Arctic Circle.
The park was named by Robert Marshall, a man who visited the area repeatedly beginning in the 1930s. Robert Marshall is considered to be one of the greatest conservationists in United States history.
Gates of the Arctic National Park no roads within it and this makes it less popular with tourists. Only a little over 12,660 visitors entered the park in 2014.
Most people visit the park via bush plane, or they choose to hike in from a native village in the area.
There are many Eskimo tribes in Gates of the Arctic National Park, which depend on the local wildlife for food. Most of these tribes make everything they own, except for their hunting rifles. Some of these Eskimo tribes include the Noatak and Kobuk river tribes. The Koyoukan Indians also live in the park.
The region was inhabited by Nomadic people dating as far back as 12,500 years ago. They survived by relying on the wildlife in the area.
Two main herds of caribou migrate through Gates of the Arctic National Park each spring and each fall. These caribou are vital for the Eskimo and Native tribes to survive as they are used for both food, and for making clothes.
There are six Wild and Scenic Rivers in Gates of the Arctic National Park including Alatna River, John River, Kobuk River, Tinayguk River, a portion of the Noatak River, and the North Fork of Koyukuk River.
There are mountains inside the national park including Endicott Mountains and a portion of Schwatka Mountains, Mount Igikpak, and Arrigetch Peaks.
Although there aren't any established campgrounds in Gates of the Arctic National Park, visitors can camp in the park.
Wildlife that can be found living in Gates of the Arctic National Park includes Alaskan moose, polar bears, muskrats, river otters, Canadian lynxes, Dall sheep, marmots, muskoxen, wolverines, artic foxes, red foxes, caribou, timber wolves, beavers, coyotes, Grizzly bears, also known as brown bears.
More than 145 bird species have been spotted in Gates of the Arctic National Park over the past 30 years including the peregrine falcon, bald eagles, northern hawk owls, great horned owls, red-throated loons, trumpeter swans, sandhill cranes, sandpipers, and ospreys among many others.
Visitors to Gates of the Arctic National Park can enjoy bird watching, camping, hiking, day trips by air, site seeing trips by air, and fishing.


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